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As Novelas – By James Brodows

The novela Celebridade leaps from the Brazilian televisions and streets. At last week’s Flamengo soccer match the fans shook homemade signs: Quem matou Lineu? (Who killed Lineu?) The question on everybody’s mind after the soap opera murder. And this week with the revelatory episode looming: Eu matei Lineu (I killed Lineu) Eu sei quem matou…

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Knuckles – By Jessica McDermott

A friend once told me the only part of the human body that doesn’t turn to ash after cremation are knuckle bones – like little Jacks, small concaving squares with the durability to withstand temperatures reaching above 1,5000 degrees Fahrenheit. My dad’s knuckles are fat. From growing up on a farm and playing basketball for…

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Baby – By S.W. Campbell

We were all sitting at the dinner table the first time Baby brought up that she wanted to get the gastric bypass surgery. Momma was dead set against it from the beginning. I can still hear Momma’s high pitch voice squealing across the room, her hands frantically smoothing the table cloth. “Oh god no Baby. You…

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January, Lake Champlain – By Holly Painter

Frozen mounds reared up beside the only vents in the ice, where water sighed through between drifting slabs covered in tiny cracks like a war of spiders. We sat to loosen our snowshoes and charging onto the ice, my wife hollered, Who’s dancing on Lake Champlain? We’re dancing on Lake Champlain! 17 degrees, the warmest…

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Rain – An Interview with Zebulon Huset

In the latest issue of Apeiron Review, we featured Zebulon Huset’s “Rain,” a story about a young girl named Sarah who loses her father, her brother, a close friend, and to some extent, the woman her mother used to be. We see Sarah playing happily in the rain as puddle-splashes cause her to reflect on her life….

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Tips from the Slush Pile: Beginnings

I’ve been reading fiction submissions for Apeiron Review for four years, and I’m not exaggerating when I say I’ve gone through a few thousand short stories in that time. With that experience comes (I hope) a greater understanding of the mechanics of short fiction. I could ramble endlessly on what makes or breaks a short story, but…

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Utopia – By Nashae Jones

She chewed the bone down to the bristle. “Slow down.” She heard the remark, but kept grinding her teeth down on one of the empty bones. “Antoinette,” her mother hissed. She couldn’t stop. Her fingers slipped through the remaining meat, gliding through, tearing mercilessly. Her mother pulled back her arm. “Slow down girl. You’ll choke…

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Rain – By Zebulon Huset

The rain was falling so hard that if it didn’t hit you on the way down, it bounced high enough to hit you from the ground. These were the kind of afternoons Sara liked best. When all the stores closed and everyone hid inside their houses, or, when the tornado sirens go off, as they…

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Batman, Retired: An Interview with Trevor Pyle

I always identify as student first, and anything else second, though I know this identity will someday end. I read this poem as a fresh Intern here at the Apeiron Review in July of 2015. As I read through all these serious poems that tugged at my heartstrings and made me think about bigger issues outside myself –…

Why do Book Festivals Matter?

Once a year at the beginning of October, literary chaos in the form of vendors, publishing houses, entrepreneurial writers and slam poets make their way to Collingswood, NJ for a day of writing, reading and book selling. The last two years, rain has plagued the festival but has never fully managed to stop the excitement….

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