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Tips from the Slush Pile: Beginnings

I’ve been reading fiction submissions for Apeiron Review for four years, and I’m not exaggerating when I say I’ve gone through a few thousand short stories in that time. With that experience comes (I hope) a greater understanding of the mechanics of short fiction. I could ramble endlessly on what makes or breaks a short story, but…

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Utopia – By Nashae Jones

She chewed the bone down to the bristle. “Slow down.” She heard the remark, but kept grinding her teeth down on one of the empty bones. “Antoinette,” her mother hissed. She couldn’t stop. Her fingers slipped through the remaining meat, gliding through, tearing mercilessly. Her mother pulled back her arm. “Slow down girl. You’ll choke…

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Rain – By Zebulon Huset

The rain was falling so hard that if it didn’t hit you on the way down, it bounced high enough to hit you from the ground. These were the kind of afternoons Sara liked best. When all the stores closed and everyone hid inside their houses, or, when the tornado sirens go off, as they…

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Batman, Retired: An Interview with Trevor Pyle

I always identify as student first, and anything else second, though I know this identity will someday end. I read this poem as a fresh Intern here at the Apeiron Review in July of 2015. As I read through all these serious poems that tugged at my heartstrings and made me think about bigger issues outside myself –…

Why do Book Festivals Matter?

Once a year at the beginning of October, literary chaos in the form of vendors, publishing houses, entrepreneurial writers and slam poets make their way to Collingswood, NJ for a day of writing, reading and book selling. The last two years, rain has plagued the festival but has never fully managed to stop the excitement….

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Modern Fairytale: An Interview with Andréa J. Onstad

In our most recent issue of Apeiron Review, we featured the short story “The Cat and The Tree” by Andréa J. Onstad. The story reads like a fairy tale or bedtime story. Though the work features heavy elements of tragedy, the story is told with an almost motherly sense of care and reassurance, making this…

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A not so brief conversation about “The Brief History of Attraction”

Sally Zakariya blew me away this evening.  So easy to talk to, we found ourselves on several tangents on topics such as love, career, and each other’s experiences.  “A Brief History of Attraction” can be found in Issue 9 of The Apeiron Review. This poem, which reads more like a short poem about life than…

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Cheryl Smart: Issue 9

Cheryl Smart, author of “Red Dresses” from Issue 9 of  Apeiron Review, is the nonfiction editor of the University of Memphis’ The Pinch. “Red Dresses” snagged my attention from beginning to end, and I found myself thinking that it was too short and just the right length and simply perfect all at once. The timelessness of…

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So it Goes

Admittedly, the title of this post is a bit dramatic, especially in the Vonnegut sense since I am not about to inform you of someone’s demise. It is still an apt phrase, though. The “it” of the sentence is Apeiron and it certainly goes, or is going. Verbage aside, I’m here to update you with what…

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